Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Feeling broken

Turns out that Sally Yates openly defying the Trump Administration did not come out of nowhere.

The Washington Post reports that she and her office briefed the White House on Jan. 26 about the conversations between Michael Flynn and the Russian ambassador. Why was nothing done?  Well:

The White House Counsel's Office conducted a “review” of the legal issues and determined that “there was not a legal issue but rather a trust issue,” Spicer said.
So, Donald Trump, having been briefed by the Acting Attorney General that Flynn had engaged in illegal activity, determined that this wasn't a legal issue.  It's a trust issue.  Can he really trust Flynn after misleading Mike Pence?  Oh, come now, we've all mislead Mike Pence at some point.  Why do women keep trying to tell me what I can and cannot do?

Four days later, Yates said that she could not defend the Muslim ban.  Openly.  Since her previous attempt to work the chain of command failed.  She was fired.

This story has broken me.  I think I hit my limit.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Thank the Resistance: Members of the New England Patriots

At least five members of the New England Patriots have decided to skip the celebratory White House visit because of Donald Trump:

  • Martellus Bennett
  • Devin McCourty
  • Dont'a Hightower
  • LeGarette Blount
  • Chris Long
Hell, if you win the Super Bowl, you can celebrate however the hell you want to.  I know I wouldn't want to celebrate professional achievement with Donald Trump.  

Gov. Hogan Doesn't Like Mean People on Facebook

As this is posting this morning, I am dropping copies of this letter in the mail to the Governor of Maryland and the Chair of the Maryland Republican Party, because, DAMN, this is the best way to kill the GOP in Maryland... piss off every educated woman in the state.

I am writing in response to the article published on the Washington Post website entitled “Gov. Hogan’s office has blocked 450 people from his Facebook page in two years”, that refers to your spokesman, Doug Mayer, trivializing the comments of women who criticized you for not speaking about the ban on Muslims because he believed they were “part of an organized campaign.” Whether or not they were organized, you (or your agents acting on your behalf) still refused to allow residents of the State of Maryland to voice their concern over your inaction.
                I am one of the estimated 925,000 women in Maryland who has at least one college degree. Between Mr. Mayer’s statement, and statements from White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer that protesters are being paid, the message I am receiving from the Republican Party is that women are too stupid to formulate their own opinions and to take action on their own volition to make these opinions known.  Your silence appears to confirm that you agree that women lack, or should lack, the agency to make up their own minds, and cannot process information without being told what to do by outside actors.
                I attended the Women’s March on Washington on January 21st with 5 million Americans across the country to put politicians on notice that we would watch what you were doing with regards to civil rights, environmental protections, sexism, racism, ethics, and your willingness to uphold the Constitution and the separation of powers. [No one paid me. Between Metro fares and Starbucks purchases, it cost about $20 for me to attend.] As each Executive Order and Presidential Memo was signed that undermined these issues, you said nothing. Silence is consent. By not speaking out after three weeks, how can we not assume that you agree with President Trump’s agenda?
                The people of Maryland are noticing your silence. What you say, or do not say, in the next few weeks will be remembered at the ballot box in 2018, not just in the governor’s race, but in every race on the ballot that involves a Republican candidate. It is already late to speak up. You have a number of angry people in the state, and you owe us an explanation of your political priorities.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Thank the Resistance: Gov. Jay Inslee and Gov. Mark Dayton

Props to the governors of Minnesota and Washington.  Thanks for being behind the suit to stop the Muslim ban.

(Mad Midwestern love going out to Minnesota.)

Thank you notes being sent to Olympia and St. Paul.

Dumb Presidential Memo #1: STOP DOING GOVERNMENT!!!!!

First Presidential memo: Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies, signed January 20th.

Just in case you missed it, or forgot it, or have blocked this from your mind, just three weeks ago (seriously, three weeks?), President Trump signed his first stupid Presidential Memo, the "Stop Doing Government" Memo.

Reince Priebus appears to have drafted it, telling everyone in government - no new regulations, no putting into effect any approved new regulation, and you know, maybe everyone in the White House just needs 60 days or so to figure out what we're doing before you guys all do stuff?  Cool?

This isn't so much of a demand, more like a request. And, of course, the language that walks this back in case the courts or the Congress is making you take action because we forgot to hire lawyers in the transition and dear God, what is that pain in my chest?

Screw it, OMB will tell you when you can do government again. 

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Feminism and Gender Stereotypes

Remember after the September 11th attacks when everyone wanted to drop everything and go off and do something, and President Bush told us all to go shopping?

President Trump is now telling us to boycott Nordstrom in a Tweet, because they shouldn't drop the clothing line of his daughter, who is a great person, and as you know, bad things never happen to good people in business.  Business always rewards people who are nice people, right?  (Coffee is for closers.)

So, if you want to be part of the feminist resistance to Trump, go shopping at Nordstrom.  Okay... but I'm a little ambivalent that my action of protest against a sexist man who tries to perpetuate outdated gender stereotypes is to do the most. stereotypical. activity. ever.

Thank the Resistance: Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski

Taking some time to write thank you letters to Senators Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski:


These Republican Senators broke with their party to vote against Betsy DeVos, and I'm sure that's not sitting well with the rest of their party.  Even though they brought up a great point (that I wish I had thought of), that school choice can only work when there exists a choice in schools.  If you live in a rural area, and already have a one to two hour bus ride to get to school, are you really going to drive 3 hours to go to another school?

Plus, disability services generally are more expensive than a voucher will cover, and there's a conflict of interest with her student loan collection agencies, and the complete lack of qualifications to hold this position... and, seriously, grizzly bears is why a school in a major city needs to have guns?

So, writing thank you notes for all of their offices, because, face it, they've probably been fielding angry phone calls, and will be in the future.  My sincere thanks for trying.

The Invisible Hand Plays in Peoria

Well, Peoria, you had a good run.  Face it, there's really no reason that your city should exist.  Somehow, you managed to attract a major manufacturer, which led to a nice long streak of moderate success with a minor league affiliate, a mid-tier university, and a high school boys basketball powerhouse.  As Peorias go, Peoria, Illinois is a solid #2 in the country. But there's no organic reason for Peoria to exist in the 21st Century.

Sure, Peoria, back in the 19th Century, using water resources for milling grains was needed. Plus, being near the farms where grain was grown so it could be processed was also a good idea.  Not needed so much anymore.  And, if Wikipedia is accurate, then that high quality Illinois River water would be a boom to the distilling industry, until Chicago reversed the course of the Chicago River, dug a canal, and started shipping its sewage your way.

Really, you got lucky that farm equipment was expensive to ship when everything was transported to farms by horses.  It made sense to manufacture equipment close to where they would be used when the supply chain is so slow.  So, again, kudos!  Caterpillar got lucky, especially when they realized they could make money by modifying farm equipment into construction equipment to build roads, right when Federal funds for road construction became more widely available.  Peoria hit a boom!

But with the boom, there comes the bust.  Of course, the bust occurred much slower than the boom. When the roads were built, then replaced with Interstates, and the supply chain became faster and more global, then why build things in Peoria?  Especially when the demand for construction equipment is higher in developing countries than in a country that is already developed?  What makes you special?

Maybe if Cat had really invested in its people, things would be different. Maybe if executives started as front-line managers, worked their way through the the company, and then joined the C-Suite after 30-40 years of service, then maybe attracting executives wouldn't necessitate a move to Chicago.  And, I know, it's got to bother you that billionaires look at you and say, Nope, not Peoria. You could have tried to cultivate a business community that included more than one company, but you never really did, and no one was going to move to you, not with major universities in other cities - those same universities where the best and brightest of your high school grads went, and the then never came back. In this negative feedback loop where anyone who can leave leaves, how much longer was it before Caterpillar left for Chicago?  What makes you special?

This is a tough love post, I know, but if you can't answer that question of what makes you special, then the free market is not going to give out jobs and favors to you. You have to have an advantage. Chicago has these advantages, sure, in the number of other large companies nearby so Caterpillar can poach talent as needed, and executives can look at them and breathe a sign of relief that they aren't moving to Flint, Michigan (water still undrinkable). There's still a reason that Chicago exists - mostly through fresh water, world-class schools, research hospitals, and the logistics of having to move things around the Great Lakes means roads and railroads needing to hit the southern edge of Lake Michigan. Not you. Not Peoria.  As the economy moves into a new, global world, what makes you special?  And, your manufacturing jobs - the people who hold them - what makes them special?  What can they do that can't be done in any small city anywhere in the world.

No one is guaranteed the right to have a corporate HQ in your town. And, as Caterpillar continues its move out of Peoria, and property values fall as more people move out than move in, you better answer the question of what makes you special, or else there may be no Peoria left.

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Mean People


So, that happened. How big does your ego have to be to believe that anything bad said about you can't be true?  Is the entire world supposed to be some kind of safe space for the President?

I heard that Mr. Trump did not really understand what the job of President was, even after he was elected.  If this had been an election centered around policy, then there is the ability to criticize the policies without criticizing the person. But that was never how Trump operated, so when people don't approve of the job he's doing, how else is he going to take this except as an attack on his person?

If you need me, I'll be drinking.

Dumb Executive Order #1: Repeal Obamacare

Tracking the executive orders and memos of Donald J. Trump, and how you know that no expert actually looked at them before he signed them, Part I:

Executive Order Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal, Signed January 20, 2017.

You know this one has to be good, because the title includes "Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection", which if you take out the "the", really gets at the heart of the order - protecting patients imposes an economic burden on somebody, but it's not the patients.

Section 1 - the confusing part here is that it really doesn't do anything.  The President can't just repeal a law that Congress passed.  It's like the Constitution is still a thing.  Instead, we want the healthcare markets to be more competitive!  Yeah!!!!  Free market!!!!  ...except for that pesky ethics problem and known market failure in the health care market.  There's no access to perfect information in setting a price, mostly because in order to do this, doctors and patients need to know how much someone is willing to pay for an operation that will save their life.  Is open heart surgery worth $5,000?  $10,000?  $100,000?  That's unfettered capitalism, and I doubt people really want to be thinking about their doctors as maximizing profits when they decide whether or not to treat their cancer.  So, yeah... rhetoric sounds great to the Austrian Economist, but that's just about it.

Section 2 - this asks the Sec. of Health and Human Services (who isn't confirmed yet) not to impose fiscal burdens on States, individuals, or families (aw...).  Or health insurance companies, or medical device companies, pharmaceutical companies (less aw...).  Except that there is that pesky law out there.

Sections 3-4 - Flexibility!  States Rights!  Except that this is in regards to a Federal tax dollar spending, so really?  It also encourages interstate insurance markets, which might be okay, except that the ACA guidelines for minimum coverage levels will be gone.  So, everyone can purchase the health care quality guaranteed by Mississippi!

Section 5 - Oh yeah.  There is that comment period on regulations.

Section 6 - Laws exist.

So what does this do?  Not a damned thing. Congress is trying to figure out a replacement, but yeah, changing the ACA is going to be a mess, mostly because people like some aspects of the law.  We'll see what the Republicans come up with. Stay tuned!